Decision Matrix Templates

A Decision Matrix is a series of values in rows and columns that help you visualize the relationship between sets of values and information and help you prioritize which set of actions to focus on. A Decision-making matrix can help you evaluate and create the best plan of action, keeping in mind all the variables involved. In order to prioritize tasks, solve problems, and craft arguments to defend a decision you’ve already made, decision matrix templates can come in handy. 

SlideUpLift has come up with several options to visually represent a Decision Matrix to clearly communicate your decision-making process. While thinking about the prioritization of activities, go through the Pros and Cons of each activity to substantiate your decision matrix. 

What is a decision matrix example?

A good example of a decision matrix within a corporate sphere would be if your firm was intending to finalize a vendor for bulk purchases. A matrix can be created which includes criteria such as -
  • Capability.
  • Reputation.
  • Price.
  • After Sales Service etc.
Assigning each vendor a value out of 10 in terms of your requirements would prepare a matrix which consists of a score assigned to each vendor, thus making the decision-making process simpler and more effective, as one option can be shortlisted quicker.

How do you create a decision matrix?

To create a decision matrix, keep the following things in mind:
  • Think carefully about the evaluation criteria you intend to use. Involve as many stakeholders as you can to make this process comprehensive.
  • Decide on the weight of each criteria. Usually, criteria like Price are valued higher than other factors.
  • A Decision Matrix is usually an inverted L-shape, having one list of values on the left-most column and one on the top-most row.
  • Establish a rating scale that is suitable for your information. For example: 1-5 (1-worst to 5-best), 1-2-3 (1-low, 2-medium, 3-high) etc.

Which is a good reason to use a decision matrix?

Good reasons to use a decision matrix include-
  • When you need to narrow down your list of options to one final item.
  • Your options need to be weighed against multiple criteria.
  • You have a lot of stakeholders involved and each option needs to be weighed against each stakeholder’s requirements.
  • Selecting one product or plan to develop amongst many.

What is the Eisenhower decision matrix?

The Eisenhower decision matrix is a productivity tool used to optimize your tasks on the basis of priority, ensuring you are focusing on the most important tasks first. The basic premise of the Eisenhower Decision Matrix is creating a 2*2 grid, comprising specific characteristics. These include -
  • Urgent and Important.
  • Important but Not Urgent.
  • Urgent but Not Important.
  • Neither Urgent nor Important.
These categories can be further explained by browsing through our Eisenhower Decision Matrix collection, which consists of an extensive range of decision matrices that cater to every management and planning requirement.